20061024

 

DRC: GEF Project Executive Summary

Excerpt from GEF Project document, Reviewer's Comments at end: "...The Reviewer would like to suggest that in the first few months of the project
implementation the proponent inform the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues onactivities developed to promote Pygmy communities’ livelihoods and access to naturalresources in the Virunga NP. Finally the Reviewer welcome the initiative to fund local NGOs to proactively supportactivities dedicated to promote pygmy communities livelihood.

Response: The task team is grateful for this suggestion. The project will indeed inform the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues on activities developed to promote Pygmy communities’ livelihoods and access to natural resources in the Virunga NP (page 77, Annex 4). As stated in the project document (pages 14 and 77) careful attention will be given to developing activities that will enhance the well being of the pygmies’ community in the Northern Sector of Virunga. The project will not restrict pygmies’ traditional access to natural resources compared to the situation at start of the project. On the contrary, it will help secure indigenous people’s traditional rights to access natural resources for their livelihoods. It will also promote pygmies’ participation in decision-
making and planning processes related to the management of the park as well as jobs; small scale economic activities, and access to basic social services (education, health).

 

French facilitation - Brazzaville Summit (4-5 February 2005) - The Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP)

Excerpt from France diplomatie website: "...The Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP) is an informal structure which comprises twenty-nine governmental and non-governmental organizations. It was created in September 2002 on the occasion of the World Summit for Sustainable Development in Johannesburg. It is qualified as a type II partnership, i.e. a non-binding "association" of governments, private companies and organizations civil society. It is not an institution and does not have a Secretariat. The CBFP is a mirror body intended to implement the timetable approved in Johannesburg and also to respond to the Yaounde Statement (1999) on the conservation and sustainable management of the forests. Its principal task is to coordinate the various partners, without taking part directly in the implementation or in the financing of programmes, and also to promote guidelines and actions validated by the beneficiary countries and COMIFAC. The first CFPB meeting was held in Paris in January 2003. It enabled the partners to make a review of their respective activities and to examine the future stages of the Partnership. On this occasion, it was decided to entrust the facilitation of CBFP to the United States for a two-year period. The second CBFP meeting was held in Brazzaville in June 2004. It devoted its attention to the examination of the Convergence Plan of COMIFAC and considered the financing mechanisms. To facilitate the exchange of information between partners, a website was set up on the initiative of the American facilitator ( www.pfbc.org ).

Prospects for the French facilitation (FF): France proposes, on the basis of the outcomes of the American facilitation, to provide a new impetus to the partnership, of which France will become the take facilitator on the occasion of the Brazzaville Heads of States’ Summit in February 2005. While remaining within the framework of the CBPF as it was conceived originally, France wishes to strengthen the regional dynamic by an increased presence on the ground and ensuring regular monitoring of the CBFP activities. The French facilitation would like to focus its interventions on three main principles which appear to be of high priority for the next two years: The strengthening of regional co-operation at all levels; The promotion of African staff training and capacity building as regards conservation and sustainable forest management; Strengthening governance by the harmonization and respect of forestry laws and regulations and by the conclusion of voluntary partnership agreements within the framework of the European initiative FLEGT (Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade) and/or through the AFLEG initiative (African Forest Law, Enforcement and Governance)..."

20061016

 

Les Pygmee et l'exploitation forestiere industrielle: Cas des Bagyeli du sud-Cameroun

Rapport par Jacques Ngoun, Leader Pygmee Bagyeli: "...C’est depuis une quanrantaine d’années que l’Exploitation Forestière Industrielle est opérationnelle dans la région de Bipindi- Lolodorf. La SAFOR et la SFILY ont mené des activités respectivement dans les années 59 et 70. Par la suite, se sont installées la WIJMA, la BECOL, la SFK, et autres. En essayant de faire un bilan aujourd’hui, il apparait clairement que loin d’être un facteur de développemnt, l’Exploitation Forestière Industrielle est une ménace pour la vie et la survie des populations forestières en général et des Pygmées en particulier. Les avantages que ceux-ci ont pu tirer des sociétés forestières sont limités; alors que les inconvénients sont multiples: destruction du milieu de vie, d’alimentation et de méditation d’ou la persistance des questions suivantes qui interpellent les Décideurs et les Eploitants Forestiers: *Où devons-nous vivre maintenant? *Que mangeront nos enfants et nous-mêmes? *Avec quelles écorces nous guérirons-nous? *Le gouvernement et nos frères tiennent -ils compte de notre situation?* Allons-nous survivre avec la disparition de la forêt?..."

 

ROC: Map of USAID "CARPE" implementation zones in the Congo Basin

*Essential reference. The impact of CARPE on indigenous peoples in the Republic of Congo is an issue of critical importance that has not yet been acknowledged or addressed at an appropriate level. Given that traditional lands have been directly targeted, one can infer that the impact on indigenous communities may be significant. Although close monitoring and evaluation is appropriate given the heightened vulnerability of this population, USAID has failed to make its statistics, baseline indicators, impact studies or even basic information about program mechanisms to identify and mitigate unitended negative impacts publically available to organizations that seek to support the rights and welfare of this ethnic minority.

20061014

 

ROC, CAR & Gabon: TRIDOM

Map and project description

20061013

 

ROC: About CIB's operations (Pokola, Dabo and Loundougou)

*Excerpt from Forests Monitor report, which is well-researched and provides extensive citations : "Feldmeyer’s subsidiary in Congo is CIB, headquartered in Ouesso. Feldmeyer has a majority interest in CIB, which was created in 1968, and tt Timber International has a minority interest. The company has been the only commercially successful operation in the north of the country on a consistent basis...CIB has three concessions in the north of the country, totalling 1.15 million hectares - Pokola, which is its main base (480,000ha), Kabo (280,000ha) and Loundougou (390,000ha), the latter being held in reserve for future exploitation. The concessions are located in primary rainforest of high biodiversity. The area has a rich cultural heritage, being home to a relatively large number of forest hunter-gatherers, such as the Mbendjele and Baka, as well as many farming and fishing, Bantu and Ubangian language speaking sedentary ethnic groups, notably the Sangha Sangha, Bongili, Kabounga, Pomo and Kaka....Annual production is currently 250,000 cubic metres, with around 60% being processed in two sawmills at Kabo and Pakola.120 The company exports about 100,000 cubic metres of logs and 40,000 cubic metres of sawn timber each year.121 The two main species harvested are Sapelli and Sipo.

CIB used to float its logs down to Brazzaville and then send them to Pointe Noire by railway. This route has become so unreliable (due to civil war and problems with the run-down railway) that CIB has been obliged to construct a 150 kilometre road from Pokola to connect to the Cameroon road network, so it can send its logs by road through Cameroon for export from the Cameroonian port of Douala. This has enabled CIB to maintain production, even during the recent civil war, unlike other European operators in the country (see Congo (Brazzaville)). The road also, however, facilitated the commercial bushmeat trade in the area.

CIB is reported to be well regarded by most local people. There is some resentment among certain local groups who feel their traditional heritage is being exploited without adequate redistribution of the benefits. Yet the CIB is also perceived of as the local agent of development and provider of basic services, which the government has had difficulty doing. Its employment and living conditions are reported to be good and it operates within the law.126 The concessions are adjacent to the Nouabalé Ndoki National Park and are home to a substantial Pygmy population — a number of whom work for CIB rather than Bantu villagers. The very success of CIB’s venture has attracted newcomers to the locality and Pokola has grown from a small fishing village of 120 in 1972 to one of the largest centres in north Congo, with a population of around 8,000. The increased activities in the area have significantly increased pressure on natural resources and, according to a World Bank study, wildlife has been largely decimated in a 20 kilometre band around Pokola...

The company is considered to be one of the more economically sustainable and well-managed operations in the Central African region. However, CIB’s operations have not been without criticism. The facilities provided in Pokola are of a high quality but are provided by the company primarily for employees based in the town — other local people have varying degrees of access to them... A study conducted by the World Conservation Union (IUCN) in 1996 found that traditional tenure, resource access rights and resource management systems, particularly those of the Pygmies, were rapidly breaking down within the Pokola concession... The company has great influence in the area and does not welcome potential critics. It invited selected international conservationists to visit the pilot projects in 1999, as long as the company approved the composition of the visitors. To date this visit has not taken place. In 1996, the company was reported to have used its influence to prevent a potential critic from visiting its concession area. Recent field missions to the CIB concessions by the international environmental NGO World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) found that the company still has some way to go to demonstrate its commitment to achieving sustainable forest management to FSC standards..WWF complemented the company, however, on its professional harvesting techniques and technical capacity to improve its operations further and praised the collaboration with WCS regarding bushmeat hunting.

CIB has received positive attention over recent years for its activities regarding the commercial bushmeat issue, particularly a joint initiative with the US-based NGO Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) (see below). The company has taken steps to discourage bushmeat hunting and to prevent the commercial exploitation of bushmeat in its concessions. It has established an education programme for local people and issued instructions to its workers not to illegally hunt endangered species. A "Protocole d’Accord" was signed in December 1995 to this effect by members of the local communities of Pokola and Ndoki and by CIB. A partnership agreement between CIB, WCS and the Ministry of Forest Economy (MEF) was signed in June 1999, consolidating work to establish CIB’s forest management units as buffer zones to the Nouabalé Ndoki National Park and to reduce the levels of bushmeat hunting in the concession areas. The park is being managed by WCS and is considered to be of considerable importance because of its high biodiversity. In the two pilot areas, WCS claim that bushmeat hunting has declined by 60%. However, recent evidence in the nearby community of Pokola, which is the largest timber-based settlement in the area, suggests that hunters may have simply switched their activities to other parts of the forest...WCS and CIB are sceptical that local communities have the capacity to manage resources responsibly. Partly in consequence of this belief, WCS employ eco-guards armed with automatic rifles to patrol the buffer zone and logging roads around the national park. This is very unpopular with local people who see this as a gross violation of their traditional rights.

In some cases, important elephant poachers are made eco-guards in an attempt to take them out of the poaching circuit. It has been reported in the past that these guards often intimidated local people, and allowed their former poaching colleagues to pass freely through checkpoints but confiscated local people’s small amounts of game. The system has created distrust and antagonism between some conservation workers and local people and, in certain places, may have strengthened the position of some of the best-connected poachers who are commissioned to hunt trophy animals. If these issues are not tackled in an open and transparent manner, based on input from local people, this potentially positive initiative may not bear the fruit it should.

 
Company Name: Congolaise Industrielle des bois (CIB)
Major Shareholders: Feldmeyer
tt Timber International
Parent Company: Feldmeyer
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#feldmeyer
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA POKOLA; Map Plot: 13
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA KABO; Map Plot: 14
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA LOUNDOUGOU; Map Plot: 20
-----
Company Name: Société Congolaise Arabe Libyenne (SOCALIB)
Major Shareholders: Libyan
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA OUEST; Map Plot: 12
-----
Company Name: Société Industrielle Forestière de Ouesso (IFO)
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company: Danzer
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#danzer
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA EST; Map Plot: 11

 

ROC: Concession holders in Plateaux

Company Name: ESBO
Major Shareholders: M Paul OBOMBI
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA OLLOMBO; Map Plot: 17

 

ROC: Concession holders in Niari

Company Name: Afriwood Industries
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO UFE; Map Plot: 0
-----
Company Name: Atelier de la Louessé (ADL)
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO; Map Plot: 52
-----
Company Name: Bois-Placages Contreplaqués (BOPLAC)
Major Shareholders: Bruynzeel
DLH Nordisk
Parent Company: Bruynzeel / DLH Nordisk
Notes: Bruynzeel (43.5%); DLH Nordisk (43.5%); M&P Pruchtnow (13%)
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#bruynzeel
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO; Map Plot: 36
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD; Map Plot: 46
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD; Map Plot: 47
-----
Company Name: CITB-Niari
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 5 KIBANGOU; Map Plot: 59
-----
Company Name: FORALAC
Major Shareholders: Portugese
Parent Company:
Notes: Email : forpnr@aol.com
Address: BP. 216 POINTE NOIRE
Congo
Phone: 94 13 42
Fax: 94 20 86
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 4 BOUENZA UFE 3; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 8 SEXO; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 6 NKOLA; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 5b; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 5a; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 UFE 1 & 4; UFA SUD 8 UFE 2 & 9; Map Plot: 61
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 5 KIBANGOU UFE NKOLA; Map Plot: 65
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES; Map Plot: 71
-----
Company Name: KOUMBA, Bernard / SFD
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO; Map Plot: 0
-----
Company Name: Man Fai Tai***
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO UFE; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE; Map Plot: 0
-----
Company Name: NZOUNGOU, Gabriel
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO; Map Plot: 48
-----
Company Name: Société Conglolaise des bois (SOCOBOIS)
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company: Wonnemann
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#wonnemann
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 6 DIVÉNIÉ UFE 6d; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 6 DIVÉNIÉ UFE 6c; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO UFE 4; Map Plot: 35
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 6 DIVÉNIÉ; Map Plot: 37
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD UFE 5c & 5d; Map Plot: 44
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 3 NIARI-KIMONGO; Map Plot: 67
-----
Company Name: Société des Bois de Divénié (SOBODI)
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 6 DIVÉNIÉ; Map Plot: 38

 

ROC: Concession holders in Likouala

Company Name: Bois et Placages de Lopola (BPL)
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA LOPOLA; Map Plot: 21
-----
Company Name: Congolaise Industrielle des bois (CIB)
Major Shareholders: Feldmeyer
tt Timber International
Parent Company: Feldmeyer
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#feldmeyer
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA POKOLA; Map Plot: 13
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA KABO; Map Plot: 14
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA LOUNDOUGOU; Map Plot: 20
-----
Company Name: Cristal
Major Shareholders: M Emille OUESSO
Parent Company: Hazim
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA LOUBONGA; Map Plot: 23
-----
Company Name: Industrie de Transformation des bois de Likoula (ITBL)
Major Shareholders: French
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA ENYELLÉ; Map Plot: 15
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA MIMBELI; Map Plot: 22
-----
Company Name: Likouala Timber
Major Shareholders: French / Malaysian
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA BÉTOU; Map Plot: 16
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA MISSA; Map Plot: 24
-----
Company Name: Mokabi SA
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company: Rougier
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#rougier
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA MOKABI; Map Plot: 33
-----
Company Name: Thanry-Congo
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company: Thanry
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#Thanry
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA IPENDJA; Map Plot: 32

 

ROC: Concession holders in Lekoumou

Company Name: Bois-Placages Contreplaqués (BOPLAC)
Major Shareholders: Bruynzeel
DLH Nordisk
Parent Company: Bruynzeel / DLH Nordisk
Notes: Bruynzeel (43.5%); DLH Nordisk (43.5%); M&P Pruchtnow (13%)
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#bruynzeel***
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO; Map Plot: 36
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD; Map Plot: 46
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD; Map Plot: 47
-----
Company Name: Congolaise d'Exploitation des Bois Tropicaux (CEBT)
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 8 SIBITI; Map Plot: 0
-----
Company Name: FORALAC
Major Shareholders: Portugese
Parent Company:
Notes: Email : forpnr@aol.com
Address: BP. 216 POINTE NOIRE
Congo
Phone: 94 13 42
Fax: 94 20 86
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 4 BOUENZA UFE 3; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 8 SEXO; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 6 NKOLA; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 5b; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 5a; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 UFE 1 & 4; UFA SUD 8 UFE 2 & 9; Map Plot: 61
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 5 KIBANGOU UFE NKOLA; Map Plot: 65
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES; Map Plot: 71
-----
Company Name: Man Fai Tai***
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO UFE; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE; Map Plot: 0
-----
Company Name: MOUNGONDO, Victor
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 8 SIBITI UFE 8a; Map Plot: 69
-----
Company Name: NGOMA, Joseph
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 11 ZANAGA - SUD; Map Plot: 57
-----
Company Name: SFGC
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD UFE 2; Map Plot: 54
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 11 ZANAGA - SUD UFE 3; Map Plot: 63
-----
Company Name: Société Conglolaise des bois (SOCOBOIS)
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company: Wonnemann
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links: http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/part3b.htm#wonnemann
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 6 DIVÉNIÉ UFE 6d; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 6 DIVÉNIÉ UFE 6c; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO UFE 4; Map Plot: 35
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: U
FA SUD 6 DIVÉNIÉ; Map Plot: 37
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD UFE 5c & 5d; Map Plot: 44
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 3 NIARI-KIMONGO; Map Plot: 67
-----
Company Name: STCPA-Bois
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD UFE H,I & J; Map Plot: 0

 

ROC: Concession holders in Kouilou

Company Name: Bisson & CIE
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 1 POINTE-NOIRE UFE 1b; Map Plot: 0

-----

Company Name: Compagnie Forestière Industrielle des bois (COFIBOIS)
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 2e NOUWBI; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 1 POINTE-NOIRE UFE CEFOKOU; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES; Map Plot: 72

-----

Company Name: FORALAC
Major Shareholders: Portugese
Parent Company:
Notes: Email : forpnr@aol.com
Address: BP. 216 POINTE NOIRE
Congo
Phone: 94 13 42
Fax: 94 20 86
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 4 BOUENZA UFE 3; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 8 SEXO; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 6 NKOLA; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 5b; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 5a; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 UFE 1 & 4; UFA SUD 8 UFE 2 & 9; Map Plot: 61
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 5 KIBANGOU UFE NKOLA; Map Plot: 65
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES; Map Plot: 71
-----
Company Name: GOMA, Christianne Georgette
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 1 POINTE-NOIRE UFE 1c; Map Plot: 0
-----
Company Name: Kimbakala-Boungou Dieudonné
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 1 POINTE-NOIRE UFE 1d SOUNDA; Map Plot: 0
-----
Company Name: Man Fai Tai***
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 10 ZANAGA - NORD; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 MOSSENDJO UFE; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE; Map Plot: 0
-----
Company Name: QUATOR
Major Shareholders:
Parent Company:
Notes:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE NANGA; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES; Map Plot: 73

 

ROC: Concession holders in Bouenza

Company Name: FORALAC
Major Shareholders: Portugese
Parent Company:
Notes: Email : forpnr@aol.com
Address: BP. 216 POINTE NOIRE
Congo
Phone: 94 13 42
Fax: 94 20 86
Further Links:
Concessions: Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 4 BOUENZA UFE 3; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 8 SEXO; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 6 NKOLA; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 5b; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES UFE 5a; Map Plot: 0
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 7 UFE 1 & 4; UFA SUD 8 UFE 2 & 9; Map Plot: 61
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 5 KIBANGOU UFE NKOLA; Map Plot: 65
Congo - Brazzaville:- Licence: UFA SUD 2 KAYES; Map Plot: 71

 

The Global Environment Facility in Central Africa

*Key Reference for actors in the Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Uganda, Cameroon, Central African Republic and Gabon. Excerpt from "The Global Environment Facility in Central Africa: A desk-based review of the treatment of indigenous peoples’ and social issues in a sample of 14 biodiversity projects" by Emily Caruso of Forest Peoples Programme (March 2005): "...As part of a wider FPP review of GEF biodiversity policies and projects, this briefing analyses the project documents of 14 of the GEF’s biodiversity projects in Central Africa to evaluate how social and indigenous peoples’ issues were treated in project design. The evaluation examined the treatment of 6 criteria in the project documents: indigenous peoples, traditional knowledge, safeguard policies, restrictions on resource use, relocation and baseline studies. The following section of the briefing provides a short analysis of these and a more in-depth analysis of 5 selected current projects..Initial findings were as follows: • Indigenous Peoples: Although all projects have the potential to impact indigenous peoples living in these countries, 8 project documents did not mention indigenous peoples or pygmies, while 8 project documents did not invoke any human rights • Traditional Knowledge: Only 3 out of the 14 project documents examined mention traditional or indigenous knowledge, and each of these 3 documents mention it only once. One of the 3 project documents notes that it should be “promoted” within the project, while the other two note that it can be taken into account in project implementation • Safeguard Policies: The World Bank is the implementing agency for 8 of the projects reviewed,
and yet safeguard policies are only invoked in 4 of these projects, with only 2 of these having prepared Indigenous Peoples Development Plans. Only one of the UNDP-implemented projects refers to the UNDP’s Policy of Engagement with Indigenous Peoples. • Restrictions on resource use: The majority of the project documents reviewed promote the ‘alternative livelihoods’ approach, which indicates that restrictions on resource use will be implemented and some refer directly to restrictions being placed on communities with regards to access and resource use • Relocation: Three of the project documents reviewed refer directly to relocation of communities in relation to protected areas, and another two do not rule it out (i.e. note that measures will be taken should resettlement occur). One of the projects notes that a resettlement plan will be prepared for
the affected communities (Uganda Protected Areas and Sustainable Use project).• Baseline studies: Only one of the project documents reviewed specifically notes the preparation of baseline studies, including social assessments, prior to project implementation.

20061012

 

On the centrality of participation

*Recommended reference by Marcus Colchester. Excerpt from "Au-delà de la «participation»: Peuples autochtones, conservation de la diversité biologique et aménagement des aires protégées": "...Les tentatives visant à associer les communautés locales à l'aménagement des aires protégées sont le plus souvent vouées à l'échec si elles sont lancées et menées de l'extérieur. Cet article examine quelques-unes des questions essentielles qui se posent au sujet des peuples autochtones et de la conservation des ressources naturelles...La place de l'homme dans la nature, concept occidental sur lequel est fondée l'écologie, va à l'encontre, des peuples autochtones. Les points de vue imposés par les écologistes ont abouti à des déplacements forcés à l'appauvrissement, à la violation des droits de l'homme et à l'effondrement des systèmes traditionnels de gestion des ressources. Les organisations gui s'occupent de la conservation adoptent de nouvelles politiques pour travailler avec les peuples autochtones mais, en même temps, la conservation imposée d'en haut et la gestion mondiale de l'environnement assurées par de vastes organismes de développement menacent de réduire ces progrès à néant. Il faut que les écologistes prennent de nouvelles responsabilités afin de veiller au respect des besoins et des droits des peuples autochtones..."

 

Comment compenser les communautes vivant dans les forets pour leur decouverte de produits medicinaux?

Apropos L'action de la Healing Forest Conservancy. Excerpt from paper by K. Morgan, FAO document archives: "...Le présent article montre qu'une grande partie des gisements mondiaux de diversité biologique tropicale sont situés dans des zones habitées par des populations autochtones qui, de ce fait, en sont les principales responsables, et que la connaissance qu'elles ont des vertus des plantes médicinales est un atout précieux pour les sociétés pharmaceutiques et doit donc être rétribuée. Cet article décrit l'action entreprise par une organisation non gouvernementale, la Healing Forest Conservancy, pour faire en sorte que les habitants de la forêt retirent des avantages de leur contribution au progrès de la pharmacopée commerciale; l'auteur propose un cadre conceptuel pour un système de rémunération des communautés autochtones en cas de découverte de produits médicinaux...Par diversité biologique, on entend la diversité et la variabilité des gènes, des espèces et des écosystèmes présents sur la planète. Les plantes, les animaux et les environnements naturels qui constituent la diversité biologique sont non seulement nécessaires au bien-être matériel de l'humanité, mais répondent à ses aspirations esthétiques et spirituelles. Beaucoup de médicaments utilisés aujourd'hui sont tirés de plantes et l'on peut espérer que le monde végétal continuera à nous fournir de nouvelles molécules utiles pour les thérapies de demain. Les espèces tropicales sont particulièrement prometteuses parce que, surtout dans les écosystèmes tropicaux humides où les saisons sont très peu différenciées, beaucoup de plantes ont acquis au cours de l'évolution des protections chimiques contre les prédateurs et les infections bactériennes ou autres; or, les molécules qui accroissent la résistance des plantes aux infections pourraient être utiles en médecine humaine...Si la destruction des habitats des plantes tropicales se poursuit au même rythme qu'aujourd'hui, un grand nombre d'espèces végétales risquent de disparaître d'ici le milieu du siècle prochain. Nous ne savons pas quels remèdes potentiels nous perdons ainsi. Il existe entre 250 000 et 500 000 espèces de plantes à fleurs, dont moins de un pour cent ont fait l'objet d'études cliniques pour déterminer leur composition chimique et leur utilité potentielle en pharmacie (Farnsworth, 1988), bien que beaucoup soient traditionnellement utilisées en médecine..."

20061011

 

A report of the strategic seminar of the EC forest platform

Excerpt from "Illegal forest exploitation and the role of civil society" (2004): "...Patrice Bigombe presented a paper on the impact of illegal forest exploitation on both the local and indigenous population. He started by defining the concept of local and indigenous population in the present context of forest exploitation. He reiterated that generally forest exploitation fails to integrate social considerations as to benefit the local and indigenous population. Taking the example of the pygmies in the forest region of center south and east
provinces (of Cameroon), forest exploitation deprives these people of their lively hood. In most cases the local population enters into conflict with the exploiter over access to the forest resources. He further remarked that the annual forest fees paid by exploiters to the State, the supposed 10% to be used by the communities around the forest concession is scarcely made available to them. The money is managed by the Mayor and there is a lack of any efficient accountability mechanism. He therefore suggested that for any meaningful benefit to the local community who are deprived of their livelihood, the money should be put in a special account controlled by them. This he believed will have a very positive impact than what presently is obtained. He mentioned also the role village elites play in exploiting with impunity the forest to the disadvantage of the local population. He remarked that the increasing involvement of the elites especially through community forest is viewed as an opportunity to enrich themselves. However ten years after Cameroon adopted its new Forest Law, little has changed at the level of those timber producing
communities. He gave the example of Lomie and Mindourou; two communities in the east province. To redress this problem, participants called for intense lobbying and advocacy both within the EU and the USA..."

 

Positive impacts of Mbuti habitation on the forest environment

Excerpt from "..The forest world as a circulation system: The impacts of Mbuti habitation and subsistence activities on the forest environment" by Mitsuo Ichikawa, Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University: "...Abstract: While the dependence of Mbuti hunter-gatherers on the forest is relatively well documented, it has not been made clear how their activities and habitation influence the forest environment in which they live. The analysis of distribution of food plants and human induced secondary forests in the Ituri Forest of Congo suggests that the forest as a hunter-gatherer habitat may have been improved by the interaction of Mbuti hunters, Bantu and other farmers, plants and animals. Most of the major food plants of the Mbuti are light-demanding trees which grow well in secondary and disturbed vegetation regenerated from abandoned campsites and fields. The food plants also germinate from the discarded food thrown around the campsite. Moreover, large quantities of minerals and organic matters are concentrated to the camp as food and fuels, which, after the consumption, are accumulated also around the campsite in the forms of ashes and human body wastes, thus enriching the soil nutrients in the vicinity of the camp. The Mbuti activities and habitation thus comprise a part of a large recycling system of the forest ecosystem. The implications of such positive human impacts on the forest environment for conservation and development issues are discussed..."

 

Bakola-Bantu relationships and perception of commercial forestry

*Key Reference. Excerpt from "The relationship between the Bakola and the Bantu peoples of the coastal regions of Cameroon and their perception of commercial forest exploitation" by Godefroy Ngima Mawoung, University of Younde: "...Abstract: The relationships between the Bakola Pygmies and the Bantu cultivators of the coastal region of Cameroon differ from one group to another. The relationship appears superficial and limited to economic exchange between the Bakola and the Bassa, Boulou, Bakoko, Mvae, Fang, Evouzok and Yassa, whereas it is based on their culture between the Bakola and the Kwassio speaking groups. In spite of such a variation in their relationships, the Bakola and Bantu groups share the same forest environment which indubitably conditions their everyday life. This paper describe in depth hitherto poorly recorded relationships between the Bakola and the Bantu, and their implications
for examining the commercial exploitation of the forest, which comprises their major source of life, but which is threatened by large scale logging industries..."

 

Traversing Peoples Lives

*Excellent report published by FOEI/CED concerning the negative impacts of the Chad-Cameroon pipeline on local communities. Provides a battery of what should be acknowledged as "Lessons Learned" which are instructive and relevant to rights-based development and conservation initiatives.

20061010

 

Roads, development and conservation in the Congo Basin

Excerpt from abstract of paper by David Wilkie, Ellen Shaw, Fiona Rotberg, Gilda Morelli and Phillippe Auzel: "...Road density is closely linked to market accessibility, economic growth, natural resource exploitation, habitat fragmentation, deforestation, and the disappearance of wildlands and wildlife. Research in the Republic of Congo shows that roads established and maintained by logging concessions intensify bushmeat hunting by providing hunters greater access to relatively unexploited populations of forest wildlife and by lowering hunters' costs to transport bushmeat to market. Reconciling the contrary effects of roads on economic development and biodiversity conservation is one of the key challenges to wildlife managers in all nations. As the Democratic Republic of Congo prepares to reconstruct its almost completely collapsed road system, the government, donors, and conservation organizations have a unique opportunity to strategically prioritize investment in segments of the network that would maximize local and national economic benefits while minimizing adverse effects on forest wildlife..."

20061009

 

Partenariat pour les forets du Bassin du Congo

Excerpt from PFBC website "...Le Partenariat pour les Forêts du Bassin du Congo (PFBC) est une association regroupant une trentaine d’organisations gouvernementales et non gouvernementales. Il a été créé en septembre 2002, au Sommet mondial sur le développement durable (Johannesburg, Afrique du Sud). Le PFBC a pour objectifs d'améliorer la communication entre ses membres et la coordination entre leurs projets, programmes et politiques afin de promouvoir une gestion durable des forêts du Bassin du Congo et d'améliorer la qualité de vie des habitants de la région..."

20061008

 

Criticism of World Bank forest sector reform policies

Excerpt from the Whirled Bank Group website: "..The World Bank has been a major force in the destruction of the world's forests by financing logging projects, transmigration projects and dam projects. Criticism of its disastrous schemes in the Amazon, South East Asia and West Africa forced the Bank to adopt a new policy in 1991 that would prohibit lending for logging in primary forest in the hope of a curbing deforestation...a January 2000 internal World Bank study showed that forest lending has not curbed deforestation or reduced poverty, despite a 78% increase in forest-related lending over the past 10 years. A new proposed policy released in 2002 has been criticized for opening the door to more deforestation...The International Finance Corporation (IFC), the World Bank's private sector arm, loaned millions of dollars to Congolaise Industrielle des Bois (CIB), a German company controlled by Bremen-based company Hinrich Feldmeyer, in the1980s for logging on a 480,000 hectare concession in Pokola, northern Congo. Pokola is just outside the Ndoki national park, a region the size of Belgium which is believed to be the only forest in the world that has never been inhabited by human beings..."

 

L’entreprise au fondement de la cité

Excerpt from report comissioned by CIB concerning its operations in the Department of Sanha, Republic of Congo: "...L’entreprise, on le sait, ne produit pas seulement des richesses. C’est aussi un lieu où s’entrecroisent des logiques sociales, institutionnelles et économiques différentes par nature. C’est particulièrement flagrant dans le cas où l'implantation industrielle de l'entreprise est située dans une région isolée. Telle est la Congolaise industrielle des bois (Cib), qui produit et transforme des grumes de plusieurs essences botaniques, au cœur de la forêt primaire d’Afrique centrale, dans la région congolaise de la Sangha. Les sociétés qui exploitent les ressources naturelles du globe - forêt, mais aussi minerais et pétrole - sont aujourd’hui la cible de critiques de plus en plus vives, alimentées notamment par les ONG environnementalistes, qui dénoncent dans le même souffle une façon effrénée d'exploiter la nature (particulièrement la nature exotique) contraire au développement durable et
des effets déstructurants sur les populations dites locales. La force de ces deux arguments est qu'ils renvoient l’un et l’autre au mythe des origines. On associe en effet, depuis la conquête des Amériques, la nature exotique au paradis terrestre et les gens qui y vivent de façon traditionnelle au bon sauvage, ce contemporain attardé dans la condition édénique. Les entreprises sont donc coupables de désenchanter un monde qui sert de refuge, dans l’imaginaire
occidental, à la nostalgie du paradis ; paradis peuplé dans le cas des forêts africaines d’éléphants, de gorilles, de Pygmées et de nombreux serpents..."

20061007

 

Mapping, capacity building and securing land tenure

Excerpt from Poole UNESCO report: "...Initially driven by negotiation strategies, the mapping process causes other things to happen within communities. It reinforces local awareness of land issues. It draws younger people in as mappers and elders as sources of knowledge. It localises cartographic operations previously reserved to distant agencies. Above all, as negotiations proceed, the mapping process elucidates a local and territorial information base, indicating where people live and have lived the resources they depend upon and their seasonal movements in gathering and hunting. After negotiations, this traditional knowledge base is kept current and continues to give distinctive form and purpose to what indigenous peoples do with their lands - it is mobilised to provide for the future rather than elucidate the past. Land settlements act as a threshold, beyond which communities face a fresh array of environmental issues and players. monitoring, protecting and restoring their lands; dealing with incursions, corporations, agencies..."

 

Forest law assessment in selected African countries

Report of World Bank/WWF Alliance (2002): Comprehensive report and statistics on timber product export, illegal logging, lost revenues for Republic of Congo, CAR and Cameroon (in addition to others). Impacts on indigenous peoples are acknowledged in the Republic of Congo section. Excellent technical resource for forestry sector.

20061006

 

DRC: The Kahuzi-Biega National Park and the IZCN/GTZ Project

Excerpt: "...The people consider the national park laws that prohibit any human activity in these areas to be too severe. Conflicts arise between the habitual rights of the people to use certain areas and the right of the state to protect these areas..The people around the old part of the park live in poor conditions and at high density (ca. 300 people per km2). Although the local population knows more or less where the park borders are, they exert severe pressure on the park mainly through their need for new fields, pastures and forest products (firewood, timber for building, game, mushrooms, medicinal plants). A corridor of 7.5 km breadth connecting the mountain forest with the lowland rain forest partly belongs to the Nindja community. 30% to 35% of this community are inside the park. Before the park was extended, the government did not negotiate with the local population about their habitual rights. Today, about 15,000 people are living within the national park, in Nindja 2,300 persons. It is hoped that compensation measures will be an incentive for them to leave the park voluntarily...The new part of the park contained several villages before it was added. In this zone the population density is less than 10 people per km2 except for some concentrations in mining areas. The people still living in the park continue to exploit the park in their traditional way by farming, keeping livestock, hunting, and mining for precious metals. The inhabitants of villages in close proximity to the park farm within its borders. As this area is so remote, the local population did not know that they were living close to a national park for a long time, and they were told about its extension only a few years ago by the authorities..."

 

DRC: Okapi Faunal Reserve

UNEP, WCMC, World Heritage UNESCO. Excerpt from website: "...Cultural Heritage: Hunter-gatherers and shifting cultivators have occupied the Ituri Forest for centuries. The ancestries of present forest peoples can be traced back to both Sudanic and Bantu migrations as well as to more pygmoid stocks. Presently, the Pygmy groups that inhabit the Ituri forest include the Efe and Mbuti. They excel in the use and identification of wild plants. Pygmies have a semi-nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle and when not hunting with traditional nets or archery, gather insects, fungi, fruits, seeds, plants, and honey. They depend on wild game and fish to supplement dietary protein requirements. Most of the agrarians in the Ituri region are Bantu, Zaire's dominant ethnic group that includes Lese, Mamvu, Bira, Ndaka, and Budu. Long standing economic and cultural ties exist between pygmies and traditional forest agriculturalists, with the pygmies depending on exchanges to acquire cultivated starch foods to supplement a forest diet rich in protein (T. Hart, pers. comm., 1995)..."

 

DRC: Indigenous peoples challenge World Bank EESRSP programme

Excerpt from "Request submitted to the World Bank Inspection Panel" by Indigenous Pygmy Organizations and Pygmy Support Organizations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (October 2005): "...We have learned of the submission, in the near future, to the World Bank’s Board of Executive
Directors of a new project entitled, “Transitional Support for Economic Recovery Credit”, which should include a “forestry governance” component.
To date, while we have not had access to the details of this component, we would like to take this opportunity to highlight in this request the risks and issues associated with this project, and with any other forest-related projects that may soon be submitted to the Board of Executive Directors. If such a project were to once again be approved as a credit that fails to implement the Bank’s
safeguard policies and procedures, and if this credit were to be disbursed without prior consideration of the interests of the indigenous peoples, without assessing the impact that it could have on both the environment and the inhabitants of the forests in the DRC, the World Bank would run the risk of further marginalizing the indigenous peoples, thereby compounding errors
committed in the past, as was the case in Cameroon, reinforcing the industrial approach outlined in the Forest Code, and consequently, exacerbating the threats that the Congolese legislative framework poses to the rights and survival of the indigenous peoples....III. World Bank failures and negligence within the framework of the EESRSP - Failure to implement Operational Directive 4.20
The World Bank decided that Operational Directive 4.20 on Indigenous Peoples would not apply to EESRSP activities, by specifying that “the Project is not supposed to include activities for areas inhabited by indigenous peoples.”..The Bank’s rationale is inconsistent with the prevailing situation. The Pygmies, who are the first inhabitants of the region, have for centuries, and even millennia,
inhabited and moved around in the forests in the Equateur and Orientale provinces. These indigenous Pygmy peoples are the “people of the forest.” Their existence, survival, cultural identity, and traditional knowledge are intimately linked to the forest, their element and life source which they revere..."

 

CARPE Strategic Plan FY 2003-2010

*Essential reference for actors in the Congo Basin, particularly in the Republic of Congo. See CARPE program comments in section "Essential References".

 

Peoples, forest area planning and participation

Excerpt: "...A number of conclusions and recommendations can be drawn for those engaged in planning and administering development projects in central Africa, particularly those affecting areas inhabited by pygmy peoples. Few, if any, unoccupied lands exist in central Africa. For the purposes of planning the development or protection of any area of land, it should be assumed a priori that any forest is occupied or claimed by some person, or some clan, lineage or group. Even if there are no overt signs of occupation (e.g. houses or garden sites), the land is most likely to be occupied intermittently and exploited by people whose lifestyles depend on frequent movement...The present diverse composition and distribution ot plants and animals in the rain forest is the result of the introduction of exotic species, the creation of new habitats and the manipulation by the forest-dwelling people for thousands of years. No areas are what most proposals and reports refer to as "pristine". "untouched", "primary" or "mature" forest. Present-day biological diversity exists in central Africa, not in spite of human habitation but because of it...The land rights of all indigenous forest dwellers must be recognized. In most central African countries, all land legally belongs to the state: however, even the state must recognize traditional rights. Traditional rights need to be articulated by these people themselves as the first step towards securing them...The value of a nomadic lifestyle should be recognized as a potentially effective strategy for exploiting the tropical rain forest in a sustainable way and as being vital to the economic, social and psychological wellbeing of forest-dwelling people. While mobility creates difficulties for governments and agencies to provide education, health and other services to tribal people, there are means of accommodating mobile lifestyles and ensuring that such people are not denied appropriate opportunities...The protection of forest areas (reserves and parks) is not incompatible with the continued presence of forest-dwelling people. The creation of protected areas should not necessitate the removal and resettlement of forest dwellers, nor should it require severe restrictions on their rights to forest resources. Frequently, indigenous groups are permitted to remain in protected areas as long as they remain "traditional" - a term usually defined by policy-makers without consultation with, or extensive historical knowledge of, the people themselves. Such restrictions lead to "enforced primitivism". The management policy for reserves should be general enough and flexible enough to allow for variation in management styles across local groups and over time...Planning the organization and management of biological reserves in central Africa will be most effective if it enlists the participation of indigenous people at levels below that of the regional government and even below that of tribal chief..."

20061005

 

DRC: Forest Code and managment practices

Excerpt: "...Since the re-establishment of relative stability in the DRC, international agencies such as the World Bank are attempting to quickly rebuild the country's economy. DRC's rainforests, which are second in size only to Amazonia, are seen as a potential source of income. Since 2003 the World Bank has provided millions of dollars of support to the Congolese government to reform forestry laws and governance. Of over forty detailed decrees that should set out exactly how the forests are to be managed, only two have been officially signed; virtually no progress has been made in developing decrees that protect community rights. Plans to produce a proper zoning plan for the forests have been dropped. A government moratorium on issuing logging concessions has been widely violated. Four years on from the passing of a new Forest Code very few people in the Congo, least of all people actually living in and depending on the forest, are aware of their rights under this law. Despite commitments to the contrary, there has been virtually no consultation by the World Bank with non-governmental organisations or citizens' groups..." **Rainforest Foundation webpage also provides links to information about COMIFAC, zoning, DRC Forest Code and other issues relevant to land, forest resources and indigenous peoples.

 

ROC: Forest policy and practice in the Republic of Congo and impact on indigenous peoples

*Recommend resource. Excerpt: "...The presence of forestry companies in the north of the country has positive and negative impacts. Many of the companies act as a surrogate for the state, creating islands of stability in otherwise neglected areas of the country. Nevertheless, their practices have critical shortcomings, such as discrimination against local people in general and against Pygmies in particular, and promotion of commercial bushmeat hunting. Forestry companies generally only recognise the rights of and enter into communication with Bantu villagers, neglecting the Pygmy forest dwellers. Bantu communities therefore tend to get most of the benefits from the operations, such as cash and goods, schools and dispensaries. Roads tend to go through their villages. Despite some positive developments, however, logging operations have negative impacts to a greater or lesser degree on all local people. From local people’s perspectives, the main problems are: The companies do not listen sufficiently to local people’s needs: Although villagers generally support logging companies, there tends to be profound disagreements over specific issues. Local Congolese may want a school to be built if the company logs their area, or they may not want large Sapelli trees near the village to be felled as they provide large quantities of caterpillars that are eaten when there is little other food available..."

 

The parks were created to protect the African wilderness - but tribal peoples are paying a high price

Excerpt: "...Exxon's £1.3bn Chad-Cameroon pipeline stretches 1,000km across arid lands and equatorial forest to the African coast. When it reaches west Cameroon it runs adjacent to an old wildlife reserve where, for centuries, thousands of indigenous Bagyeli pygmies have depended on the forest for hunting and medicines. As "compensation" for any disturbance, the World Bank, the Dutch government and international conservation group Tropenbos combined in 1999 to create the giant Campo Ma'an national park. The stated aim was to protect the forest, alleviate poverty and to allow scientific research...But a new book, From Principles to Practice, documenting nine major African conservation efforts in six central African countries, claims that the Campo Ma'an project is a disaster, threatening to destroy the Bagyeli cultural heritage and knowledge and impoverish the people further. The Bagyeli, it says, are now barred from entering a 2,000sq km zone of forest which has been put aside for scientific research, and cannot hunt or take anything from a further 4,000sq km area. With less game to hunt and less access to their medicinal plants, many have become sedentary farmers - very much against their will. The book is based on a two-year study of many of Africa's most ambitious conservation projects, led by the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), an international human rights group. It is in no doubt that the Bagyeli have been ignored by the conservationists. "It seems clear that ... the sole concern has been to advance science, with no other considerations. This is no doubt a noble objective but the people who are now paying the price, particularly the pygmies, are not the beneficiaries of this 'grandiose' work," it says...Several thousand of the Bambuti Ba'twa tribe used to live in the low equatorial forests to the west of the Rwandan border, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In the 1970s, their lands were designated a zoological and forest reserve, then a national park to protect gorillas and the pygmies were evicted in the name of conservation. Today the park is full of people mining the metallic ore coltan, and the gorillas, as well as the baboons, porcupines, wild boar and monkeys, are being systematically killed. "Life was healthy and good but we have become beggars, thieves and prowlers," said one Bambuti chief in the report. "This has been imposed on us by the creation of the national park."...

 

The myth of tree plantations

Excerpt: "..."Tree plantations help alleviate pressures on natural forests,
thereby contributing to halt deforestation." The wording may slightly
differ from forester to forester and from plantation company to
plantation company, but the above is repeated over and over again to
convince the public that tree plantations are good and should be
further supported and promoted if we wish to save the world's
forests. The above may be true in some cases, particularly where local
communities have planted trees to serve their own needs, but it is
totally untrue when it comes to large-scale fast-growing tree
monocultures. As this latter type of plantations spread at an
increasing rate all over the world, deforestation continues unabated
or even increases..."

 

Conservation Refugees: When protecting nature means kicking people out

Excerpt from Article: "...LOW FOG ENVELOPES the steep and remote valleys of southwestern Uganda most mornings, as birds found only in this small corner of the continent rise in chorus and the great apes drink from clear streams. Days in the dense montane forest are quiet and steamy. Nights are an exaltation of insects and primate howling. For thousands of years the Batwa people thrived in this soundscape, in such close harmony with the forest that early-twentieth-century wildlife biologists who studied the flora and fauna of the region barely noticed their existence. They were, as one naturalist noted, "part of the fauna."..In the 1930s, Ugandan leaders were persuaded by international conservationists that this area was threatened by loggers, miners, and other extractive interests. In response, three forest reserves were created—the Mgahinga, the Echuya, and the Bwindi—all of which overlapped with the Batwa's ancestral territory. For sixty years these reserves simply existed on paper, which kept them off-limits to extractors. And the Batwa stayed on, living as they had for generations, in reciprocity with the diverse biota that first drew conservationists to the region. However, when the reserves were formally designated as national parks in 1991 and a bureaucracy was created and funded by the World Bank's Global Environment Facility to manage them, a rumor was in circulation that the Batwa were hunting and eating silverback gorillas, which by that time were widely recognized as a threatened species and also, increasingly, as a featured attraction for ecotourists from Europe and America. Gorillas were being disturbed and even poached, the Batwa admitted, but by Bahutu, Batutsi, Bantu, and other tribes who invaded the forest from outside villages. The Batwa, who felt a strong kinship with the great apes, adamantly denied killing them. Nonetheless, under pressure from traditional Western conservationists, who had come to believe that wilderness and human community were incompatible, the Batwa were forcibly expelled from their homeland...These forests are so dense that the Batwa lost perspective when they first came out. Some even stepped in front of moving vehicles. Now they are living in shabby squatter camps on the perimeter of the parks, without running water or sanitation. In one more generation their forest-based culture—songs, rituals, traditions, and stories—will be gone..."

 

Report of the United Nations conference on environment and development (Rio de Janeiro, 1992)

Non-legally binding authoritative statement of principles for a global consensus on the managment, conservation and sustainable development of all types of forests

 

Indigenous Peoples and Protected Areas in Africa: from Principles to Practice

Excerpt from Forest Peoples Project website: "...Extensive areas of land traditionally occupied by African indigenous peoples have been given protected area status for nature conservation. In many cases this has involved expelling local communities and drastically restricting their access to plants and game resources within the protected area. Since 2000, with funding from the Community Fund and Comic Relief, Forest Peoples Project has worked with indigenous communities in Africa to analyse the impact of these conservation areas on their livelihoods and their rights, and to help them engage in dialogue with conservation agencies. The indigenous peoples involved are the Batwa of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo; Ogiek in Kenya; Maasai in Tanzania, ‡Khomani San in South Africa, Baka in Cameroon and Gabon, Bagyeli in Cameroon and Bambendjele in Republic of Congo. A key focus of the work is to examine the obstacles preventing the implementation of new, internationally agreed conservation principles that uphold indigenous peoples' rights to land and control over their resources. The project funds indigenous peoples' own initiatives to find ways of working with conservation agencies to overcome these obstacles. Lessons learned from the project's assessment of conservation impacts fed into the World Parks Congress, a highly influential gathering of conservation agencies, governments, international donors and civil society held every 10 years, which took place in Durban in September 2003..."

 

Congo Basin: NGO input to African Forest Law Enforement and Governance (AFLEG)

Excerpt from Rainforest Foundation website: "In October 2003, governments from across Africa, as well as international donor agencies and institutions such as the World Bank, met to agree new measures aimed at halting the widespread illegal exploitation and destruction of the continent’s forests. Of particular concern was the impact of the timber industry in the Congo Basin rainforests, which often operates without adequate regard for national or traditional laws...The first phase of the Rainforest Foundation's project, which was carried out jointly with the Cameroonian organisation Centre for Environment and Development, and the UK-based NGO Forests Monitor, aimed to ensure that civil society groups from the Congo Basin region were able to attend the governmental conference and play a meaningful role in the meeting and its follow-up...In association with our Africapacity programme, the project provided training and information for local organisations, many of which have had little experience in such international policy processes. We also supported the preparation and publication of series of case studies (the report of which is available from this site), researched and written by local organisations, that illustrate some of the key challenges and opportunities in improving forest law enforcement in Africa. We are planning to help these local organisation's participation in follow-up activities..."

 

Forest Management Transparency, Governance and the Law: Case Studies from the Congo Basin

Report by the Rainforest Foundation presents the concerns of civil society in the Congo Basin region about the forestry law and its implementation in their countries. It includes ten case studies concerning land laws and governance, through to the production of non-timber products, the impact of violent conflicts and deforestation, with examples drawn from Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon.

20061004

 

Summary of United Nations Forum on Forests Multi-Stakeholder Consultation

Provides insight into the dynamics of participation, power and multi-stakeholder processes where indigenous peoples and private sector interests may differ

 

Statement from NGOs working for sustainable management of forests and the rights of local communities and indigenous peoples

Excerpt: "....We, the undersigned non governmental organisations from Central Africa, which attended the ministerial conference of AFLEG or participate in the implementation of the Forest Code in the Democratic Republic of Congo, note the organisation of the 2nd commit of heads of state on the conservation and sustainable management of forest ecosystems in Central Africa, held in Brazzaville 29th January to 6th February 2005...We encourage such meetings which address important issues around sustainable management of forests in central Africa, and the challenges that Central African states and civil society face in assuring the well being of local communities. We think that regional cooperation is a key means of resolving common problems faced in the
region..In the absence of an invitation for the undersigned organisations to participate in the summit, and in the absence of a consultation on the issues to be discussed, we present below, in writing, our observations and recommendations..."

20061001

 

Inventory of Conflict and Environment (ICE): Pygmy Case Study


 

Kibira National Park, Burundi

Excerpt: "...Working with the INECN, the Parks for Peace Project is in the process of setting up a new type of consultative body, the “local watchdog committee”, in all the communes around the Kibira park. These committees are already up and running in two communes. The people themselves were worried by certain destructive practices being adopted in the park and asked to participate in denouncing these and in the seizure of products stolen from the park. The INECN and the Parks for Peace Project welcomed this initiative and asked the people to elect representatives, from hill to commune level. Establishment of these committees first entails a participatory diagnosis in which extension workers meet the people at hill level. The people of each hill then elect a committee of ten people, who in turn elect a committee of ten people per sector. These sector committees include both men and women and a representative of the Batwa (the indigenous people). Representatives from the various sectors then elect a committee of ten to represent the zone. A community plan of action is then drawn up on the basis of the five main constraints identified by the zone committees, which draw up a community conservation action plan for the park at commune level. This community conservation action plan is a pledge of partnership among the local people, the administration and conservationists, and is used as the basis for the activities of all those involved in conservation (NGOs, private sector or donors)..."

 

Forest Peoples Programme: Workshop on Indigenous Peoples, Forests and the World Bank:

Excerpt from FPP Uganda Case Study: "...This case study concerns the Batwa of the south west Uganda. It attempts to explain what has happened to them since they were evicted and excluded from their forests in 1991. It seeks to convey their experience of the conservation of these forests, and in particular it examines the World Bank’s Policy on Indigenous Peoples through conveying Batwa experience of the Mgahinga and Bwindi Conservation Trust which is funded by the World Bank..."

 

Statement from NGOs working for sustainable managment of forests and the rights of local communites and indigenous peoples, Brazzaville 2005


20060927

 

Lessons Learned: Progress Towards Participatory Managment -


 

Central African Republic: Giving the Forest Back to Pygmies


20060926

 

World Bank must not fund rainforest destruction in the Congo

*Recommended Blog by Dr. Glen Barry

 

Le rôle de l’Union europénne vis-à-vis des forêts tropicales d’Afrique Centrale


 

Les populations et les forets en Afrique Centrale


 

Sold Down the River: Bacwa, Batwa and Bambuti Peoples threatened by destruction of forest in DRC


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